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More of my shorts available! Wait, stop…I mean short story. New scifi short released, INCURSION

July 13, 2012 1 comment

You dirty minds… I’ve got a new scifi short story (not an actual pair of shorts) that just hit the various e-book platforms. It was a little idea I had rolling around in my mind for several weeks, finally sat down one day (taking up a valuable table at Barnes & Noble for many hours) and put it to paper.

Without further ado, INCURSION:

A young boy working on his village’s plantation watches as alien craft scream overhead. His first emotion is excitement… until the technologically superior aliens start shooting. He has no choice but to grow up quickly, becoming one of his village’s most trusted defenders.

Incursion is a short scifi story of a people defending themselves against an alien invasion, and shows what human nature may really mean. Approximately 3,200 words (13 printed pages).

I’ve got to go by e-book distributors’ minimum pricing rules and the story is out for $.99, so I also have this available for free download as PDF. Otherwise:

Amazon KindleBarnes & Noble NookApple iBooks

Would love to hear your feedback (and if you wanted to leave a few lines as an online review on the various e-book sites, I’d be forever in your debt…)

Excerpt from Gabriel’s Revenge – Shuttle Launch to Mars

March 27, 2012 Leave a comment

Gabriel had just cinched his straps when the Marcinko’s engines ignited, pressing each of them back into their seats in the shuttle. He heard Olszewski mutter a curse from next to him. He looked over at the private with a raised eyebrow.

“Sorry, sir. I’m a ground pounder. I hate this shit. Necessary evil to get me where I need to go I guess, but doesn’t mean I have to like it.”

Gabriel turned back to the front of the shuttle. He stared past the pilot’s helmet and out the viewport, where he could see a sliver of starry space. The ventral bay doors had begun to open.

He closed his eyes and linked his neuretics in to the Marcinko’s battlecomp feed. He saw with some satisfaction the other five in his team all did the same. He knew some did it for the thrill of watching the battle unfold, some for the situational awareness. Whatever their reasons, he didn’t blame them. It wasn’t just a learning experience for him either. He wanted to see the enemy. And see them destroyed.

The specialist that had loaded them and their gear, Allen, was also their pilot. His hand flew over the switches mounted in front of him as he prepared the shuttle for launch.

“Sirs and ma’am, hold on,” Allen called out. “The captain’s got some rapid maneuvers planned, and we’re getting spit out in the middle of them. Hope no one ate lunch yet.”

“Keven?” It was Sowers’s voice.

“Zip it,” said Brevik. “Watch.”

Gabriel kept his eyes closed and let his Mindseye show him the situation.

The Marcinko went to full power and arced down towards Mars. Gabriel felt his chest squeezed by the G-forces and tried to control his breathing as he saw multicolored stars behind his eyelids. After a few seconds the heavy acceleration eased and the stars cleared, leaving him more able to focus on the Mindseye feed.

The battlecomp tagged the blockade fighter with a red icon. The projected path of the Marcinko was just outside of its orbit, but Gabriel saw the flight path of the shuttle, once launched, went almost directly through the red icon. He remembered McTiernan’s order to the tac officer to ‘remove it from the equation’, so he was not surprised when he heard the clank of the internal missile launcher falling into place in front of their shuttle.

The rotating launcher spat two Jayhawk missiles, then immediately swung back up to the ceiling of the docking bay. Another clank sounded throughout the cabin as the launch arm grabbed the shuttle and set it into position above the open ventral doors. The Marcinko began its release maneuver and Gabriel was pressed into his seat. With a loud hiss of hydraulics that could be heard even within the pressurized cabin, the shuttle fell from the docking bay, and he went weightless.

Gabriel’s Mindseye painted a vivid image of the scene around them: the Marcinko peeling away from their position, the two Jayhawks going hypersonic in front of them, and the dusty orange globe below them. The serene image lasted only a split second before Allen fired the shuttle engines and initiated the descent.

The picket fighter never stood a chance. It was only using station-keeping thrusters and apparently not expecting an attack, especially one that came from a hole in space. The Jayhawks were on it before it even had an opportunity to light its engine.

“Hold on!” yelled Allen. Gabriel opened his eyes to look out past the pilot. The explosion of the fighter loomed ahead and grew quickly in size as the shuttle accelerated towards Mars. A sound like nails on metal decking rattled through the cabin as the debris from the explosion peppered the hull of the shuttle.

“We’re clear!” The pilot turned to look over his shoulder. “Everyone A-OK?”

Gabriel saw Olszewski raise a thumb next to him, then heard a retching from Takahashi behind him. He ignored it — at this point he was used to it — and stared out of the pilot’s viewport.

Ahead of them lay Mars. And Renay.

New excerpt from Gabriel’s Revenge, Book 3, releasing in December!

December 5, 2011 1 comment

Coming into the home stretch to get Gabriel’s Revenge, the final installment in the bestselling scifi-adventure trilogy, released! Here’s a bit from an early scene:

 

Gabriel felt the tension of the bridge atmosphere ratchet up a notch as he pushed his way through the hatch. The last time he had been here, several hours ago, he had created quite a scene. He caught more than one surreptitious glance his way from the bridge crew. He gritted his teeth and pulled himself hand over hand along the railing set into the back wall of the bridge, towards McTiernan.

“Commander,” the captain said as he noticed his presence. “You’re looking much more rested.”

Gabriel squeezed one hand on the railing, slowing his approach to a stop. He gave a slight push downwards and his feet hit the deck. He straightened his other hand and pinched the material of his pants on the side of his thigh, coming to attention as best he could in zero-G.

“Captain, I must apologize for…”

“At ease, Commander,” McTiernan interrupted, holding up a hand. “I understand. I do. I’d probably be in the same mindset as you right now if I were in your situation. No need to apologize. I’d apologize to you for calling you back before the transit, but you’re needed.”

McTiernan tapped an icon on his command chair armrest. One of the wallscreens at the front of the bridge flickered, then came to life, showing a tiny blinking icon against the blackness of space.

“We received a tight-beam transmission from this ship a few minutes ago. Actually, ship is far too strong of a term.”

He pressed a few more icons and data streamed along the right side of the screen. “It’s twelve feet long, not much bigger than a communications drone, and heavily shielded. Honestly without the transmission, we would have never seen it.” He gave a small smile. “We’ve got the best sensors in the business, and supposedly the best sensor operators as well.” He cleared his throat and one of the bridge crew cringed and ducked his head a bit.

Gabriel pursed his lips. “What was the transmission?”

McTiernan nodded to his communications officer. “Put it up, Ensign.”

Giroux turned to his console and tapped at it. A tinny voice came from the bridge overhead speakers.

“NAFN Richard Marcinko, this is Corporal Lewis Grienke aboard the MDF packetship Shadow. Coded message for Commander Gabriel. Please respond.”

Gabriel turned to McTiernan with his eyebrows raised. “There’s a man in that thing?”

McTiernan nodded. “Yes, we were as surprised as you. Damned thing is less than five feet across. Must have been like flying in a coffin.”

An image of the drop capsules screaming through the atmosphere of Poliahu flashed across Gabriel’s mind. “Been there, done that.” He squinted at the image on the screen. “Have you responded?”

“Yes, Ensign Giroux confirmed the receipt of the tight-beam with our own. The corporal is asking for you personally and will not release the message without your code.”

Gabriel shook his head. “I have no idea what code he’s speaking of, but I guess you’d better get me on the line with him.”

McTiernan waved his hand to Giroux and he opened a channel. “The packetship is still half a million miles or so away, so there’s a three second lag each way.”

Gabriel nodded. The overhead speaker beeped with the opening of the comm link.

“Corporal Grienke, this is Commander Evan Gabriel. I received your transmission, but I do not have a code.”

After a few seconds, the overhead speaker crackled. “Thank you sir, voice code received and accepted.”

Gabriel glanced at McTiernan, who merely shrugged his shoulders. “Didn’t think it would be that simple,” he said in a low tone.

“He found us, Commander,” McTiernan replied. “He probably isn’t too worried about imposters at this point.”

Gabriel nodded. “Go ahead with your transmission, Corporal.”

Before the voice returned, Giroux called out. “Captain, I’m receiving a data stream overlaid on the transmission. It’s clean. Shall I put it up?”

“Go ahead, Ensign, same screen.”

The image of the ship and its statistics disappeared, replaced by a schematic of the solar system. The Ryokou wormhole was a green square, surrounded by several red dots, with Mars a flashing yellow circle. Numbers scrolled down one side of the screen showing distances, projected armament, positioning, open corridors, and other tactical data.

“Commander, I have a message from Major Andon,” Grienke’s voice continued. “He sends his regards and his congratulations for a mission well done on Eden, but has a significant warning to pass along. And yes sir, he used the word significant. You should be seeing the data I collected on my flight out. It was…tight…getting through undetected, as the wormhole approach is littered with Chinese fighters armed to the teeth. I’m sure they didn’t see this packetship, but they probably picked up the wormhole transit. I fully expect them to know you’re on the way. Major Andon’s warning is that these fighters have orders to shoot the Marcinko on sight, no questions asked.”

Several seconds passed in silence. Gabriel squeezed the railing hard enough to make his knuckles go white. “Just like Eden,” he said under his breath.

Grienke went on. “I’ve sent you the data on the wormhole area. I’m also sending you data on the Mars blockade ships as best as we can detect. The bulk of the Chinese ships are at Ryokou, only a handful around Mars. They seem to be putting quite an effort into blocking your entry into the system. Major Andon has also enclosed data on the situation on the ground, which is a second packet I’m sending you.”

Giroux raised his hand. “Received, Captain.”

“Corporal, stand by to be picked up,” said McTiernan.

A few seconds ticked by as the light speed transmission went out and was answered.

“Ah, sir, I’m supposed to continue on to Calypso to be attached to the MDF training force. This mission sort of dovetailed with my schedule, blockade or not. Lucky me, right?” A small laugh came through the speaker. “And while it’s a bit tighter quarters than I expected, I’d rather keep going than join you in a firefight. No offense, Captain.”

“None taken, Corporal,” McTiernan replied. “Safe travels, and thank you for the information.”

“Thank you, sir, and good luck. Shadow out.”

McTiernan shifted in his command chair to face Gabriel. “What is it with the Chinese connection?”

Gabriel shook his head, still staring at the solar system schematic. “Wish I knew, Captain. But I get the feeling we’ll find out soon enough.”

***

Enjoy the genre, like the scene? Get into the trilogy with book 1, Gabriel’s Redemption, and book 2, Gabriel’s Return, available for all e-book platforms using the links on the right of this page. Thanks for stopping by!