Simon & Schuster Joins Forces With Author Solutions To Rip Off Writers

November 28, 2012 2 comments

David Gaughran’s got a great breakdown on a massive dick move by a major publisher, somewhat under the radar. Around $5k to publish, pennies on the dollar on royalties. Wow, such a deal. Writers beware…no seriously, if you’re looking to self-publish and considering a service to assist, PLEASE read his article first.

David Gaughran

Simon & Schuster has launched a self-publishing operation, Archway Publishing, contracting one of the most disreputable players in the business to run the show: Author Solutions.

We’ll get to that distasteful link-up in a second, but first let’s have a look at what Simon & Schuster are offering prospective customers (i.e. writers).

Fiction packages start at $1,999 and go up to $14,999. If you have written a business book, prices are saucier again: $2,999 to $24,999.

While the upper end of the pricing spectrum is obviously shocking, some of you might think that $1,999 isn’t too bad if you are getting a proper edit and a decent cover.

Not so fast.

That price tag doesn’t include any real editing, just an assessment which – according to their own website – is “not a replacement” for editorial services but “a preliminary diagnostic tool.”

But what if you need proper editing?…

View original post 1,108 more words

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized

In Mexico on business. No really, I am. Swear.

November 13, 2012 6 comments

I just realized today I haven’t posted any new material here in over three weeks. I suck.

The reason (excuse, whatever you want to call it) is I’ve been spending a lot of time since early October working on some projects with partners (day job stuff), and this week all the partners will be meeting with suppliers/hoteliers in Cancun for a week. It’s been a crazy month getting things together.

I’ve also been slacking on the blog because I’ve been, you know, writing. That thing I’m supposed to do. While I’m not “formally” doing National Novel Writing Month* this year, meaning I’m signed up for it and I’m writing during it, but not doing the hashtag blasting of word counts/Facebook writing groups/NaNo forums/etc. Just writing. And I can proudly say that as of 10PM Sunday night, my 11 day total for word count this calendar month just cracked 40,000. Not bad, not bad at all.

* An aside – Gabriel’s Redemption, my first full length work, was done (first draft) in 26 days during NaNoWriMo 2010, and Gabriel’s Revenge (3rd in trilogy) was ‘completed’ during NaNoWriMo 2011. This year, nothing formal, but working on something for fun (secret, sorry) in addition to Liberation (scifi work in progress).

I’ll be online here and there during the week, so if you see fit to drop me a comment below – you know, if you feel bad that I’m stuck in Cancun in November at a five star luxury resort – I’d love to hear from you.

Salud!

 

 

 

UPDATE: Hey, just for the halibut (and just because I need some sanity from my online friends while I’m slaving away in meetings and inspections), I’ll give away a free ebook copy of Gabriel’s Journey, the complete Gabriel scifi trilogy, via a Smashwords coupon to the person who leaves the MOST CREATIVE comment on this post by 9AM ET November 14th. Ready? GO.

Categories: Thoughts

Author Interview with Robert Swartwood, new horror/thriller release THE INNER CIRCLE – and a GIVEAWAY

October 16, 2012 12 comments

UPDATE: Winners announced, check the bottom of the comments. Thanks everyone!

I’ve met some great fellow authors online over the past couple of years, but in this social media day and age, the vast majority of them have been online. Certainly nothing wrong with that, it’s the way of the world, but I consider it a rare privilege to be able to get together in person with some of these fine folks. One fine folk I call a friend is Robert Swartwood, the successful self-published author of several horror and thriller novels, the latest of which is THE INNER CIRCLE, and someone who was a woman the first time I met him.* This is the second in his horror/thriller trilogy, and he was kind enough to put together an interview about this, and the first in the series (MAN OF WAX).

* Okay, I can’t put that statement out there and leave it hanging… One of the first e-books I bought was NO SHELTER by a new female author, Z. Constance Frost, who I “met” in an online writers forum (and you know how those ‘meeting online’ things can be…mysterious). I had numerous conversations with her, noticed she was very good friends with Robert Swartwood (and even did some interviews with him!), promoted each other’s books, and so on. I even encouraged young Z. Constance to join Twitter, where so many other helpful authors reside! So imagine my surprise when Z up and turned into a man. (Robert wrote No Shelter under a pseudonym because it was a different type of novel than he normally wrote.) It took several days before I stopped feeling dirty… (Cut to bathroom scene from The Crying Game.)

Robert and I live less than two hours from each other, so we had a fantastic couple of hours at lunch (in a brewpub…writers don’t mess around) discussing writing, marketing, and other highbrow activities. Looking forward to doing it again. Make sure to visit his site and take a peek at his books, all very highly rated.

Short and Sweet Third-Person Bio

Robert Swartwood was born in 1981. His work has appeared in such venues as The Los Angeles ReviewThe Daily BeastPostscriptsChiZineSpace and Time,Wigleaf, and PANK. He is the editor of Hint Fiction: An Anthology of Stories in 25 Words or Fewer, which was chosen by The Nervous Breakdown as one of their favorite books of 2010, and was featured on NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon.

Oh, and check out these covers…they drip professionalism. Love ’em (click to enlarge):

       

Now without further ado, my interview with Robert, and a SPECIAL GIVEAWAY at the end (so read all the way through, folks…no cheating):

SU: If someone put a gun to your head and said, “Send a promotional 140 character tweet about The Inner Circle, and make it good”, what would you type?

RS: “The Inner Circle is The Hunger Games meets The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo but even better!” … or something like that. I’m not good at promotional tweeting.

SU: Is the story more horror than thriller, or thriller than horror?
RS: Well, I guess that all depends on your definition of horror. Most people, I think, view horror as zombies and vampires and ghosts and everything else that goes bump in the night. Me, I view horror the same way Douglas Winter does. As he wrote in the introduction to his 1982 anthology Prime Evil: “Horror is not a genre, like the mystery or science fiction or the western. It is not a kind of fiction, meant to be confined to the ghetto of a special shelf in libraries or bookstores. Horror is an emotion.”

So is The Inner Circle (not to mention Man of Wax) horrific? Very much so, yes. In fact, I have received some one-star reviews of Man of Wax where readers make it about 15% into the book and stop because, they claim, it’s so “dark and disturbing” and “disgusting.” Personally, I don’t think it’s THAT dark and disturbing and disgusting, but I can see where some people would think so. Thing is, though, I am not one to show the dark and disturbing and disgusting. I’m not a fan of “torture porn”; in fact, I find myself almost bored by it, because it’s the same thing again and again. Some might argue there are instances where torture porn applies to these two books, but that again comes down to what your definition of torture porn (and horror) is. The books deal with a secret group of people who get off watching other people tortured and put through extreme situations, but the books are much more than that. In many ways they’re about survival, about the dark depths of human nature, while at the same time trying to show there is still hope.

So, to get back to your question, more horror than thriller or more thriller than horror? That, again, would have to depend on each reader’s definition of what horror (not to mention thriller) is. But the books are very fast-paced, so there’s that. I try to keep the action going as much as I can. At the same time … well, as some other readers have noted, they are dark and disturbing.

SU: In the first book, Man Of Wax, you have two very central protagonists: Ben Anderson and Carver Ellison. Considering they have such different backgrounds and roles, did you find it difficult to get into their heads writing the story?
RS: First, let me talk about where Man of Wax came from. Many years ago I’d had this idea about someone waking up in a strange place with no idea how he got there. It wasn’t necessarily a new idea, but I kept returning to it until one day I sat down and knocked out that first chapter. I don’t outline, at least not on paper; oftentimes I’ll think about the book for awhile in my head and get a good sense of where I’m starting and heading before I actually start writing. Like Harlan Coben says, it’s like taking a road trip across the country; you know where you’re starting and where you’ll end up, but you don’t know what will happen along the way. That’s sort of how I write. But in this instance, I had no clue where the story was headed. I just wrote that first chapter. Then I wrote the second chapter. Then third. Then fourth. Before I realized it, a week had gone by and I’d written close to 30,000 words. When I saw how much I had gotten done and the speed at which I was writing it, I pushed myself to keep going, and ended up finishing the entire 90,000-word novel in three weeks. (And no, I have never participated in NaNoWriMo.)

Now, let me clarify something: I had just graduated college, I was still living at home, my two jobs were substituting for a middle school and high school and working as an assistant manager at a movie theater. So, with all those factors, I had the opportunity to write as much as I could. There were mornings when I would get called to take a subbing job and would turn it down. When I went to work at the theater, I would take my laptop along and work up in the projection booth and write between sets. My girlfriend at the time (now my wife) understood how hard I was working on the novel and didn’t press me to spend time with her … well, okay, not that much time.

Anyway, so when I started Man of Wax, I knew a little about Ben Anderson’s character, but none of Carver Ellison until he showed up halfway through the book. And then … everything just happened to fall into place. I didn’t have trouble getting into their heads because they were already there, just waiting to be written.

SU: The Inner Circle picks up where Man Of Wax left off, with Anderson joining Ellison against the mysterious, behind-the-scenes Caesar who runs the “games.” How have those two protagonists changed since you first introduced them?
RS: Ben has changed greatly. In Man of Wax, my idea was to create a “realistic” thriller. Meaning the good guys don’t always win. Meaning the protagonist isn’t necessarily the hero type. You drop the majority of us in a situation where we wake up in the middle of nowhere, with our families gone, and are forced to partake in a terrible game, and we don’t immediately become Jason Statham. Especially when our family’s lives are on the line and any false step on our end might mean their death. So it’s a delicate situation, and I have found some readers really love Ben while others don’t care for him much at all. Again, he’s supposed to be “normal,” whatever that means, plus he has a dark secret to his past, something he never even told his wife about, so there’s that.

But in The Inner Circle, two years have passed and Ben has changed drastically. He hasn’t found his family yet, and doesn’t think he ever will, so he doesn’t have much left to live for. Instead he becomes a soldier in Carver’s army against Caesar, and he steps up in a major way — in fact, he almost becomes that Jason Statham character we all like to think we would become in dire situations.

As for Carver, he is still doing whatever he can to get to Caesar and those in the Inner Circle. We do, however, learn more about his back story, and why and how he has become man he is.

SU: Man Of Wax, as the first in the series, was very mysterious and dark. Now that much of the mystery is out in the open, what does The Inner Circle bring to the table?
RS: Man of Wax showed what the games were like from the player side of the table. In The Inner Circle, we now see the aftermath, about those few who managed to leave the games alive, and how they’ve struggled with the consequences. We also get much closer to learning the truth about what the games are all about and what else Caesar has in store, not just for the Inner Circle but for the entire world.
SU: Give us one line, whether it’s description or dialogue, from The Inner Circle that gives a good example of the story.
RS: As I mentioned, in the second book Ben has become a completely different person. And near the beginning of the book, when he’s headed into a really bad situation and one of the other characters tells him not to, that he might end up dead, Ben says, “All of us are already dead, Ronny. We just don’t know it yet.”
SU: And I can’t end this without asking the logical question – what are the plans and/or progress on a follow up? Will this be a trilogy, or continuing saga?
RS: It will definitely be a trilogy. I haven’t started working on the third book yet — I want to work on something lighter, a new Holly Lin novel perhaps — but I hope to start working on it next year. It will be just as long as The Inner Circle, which ended up around 120,000 words.

Thanks for having me here, Steve!

GIVEAWAY TIME: Easy stuff here. Robert has generously donated a free e-book copy of the first in the series, Man of Wax, to ANYONE who helps spread the word about this interview and comments below. Simply link to this blog page, retweet it, share on Facebook or Google+, even post it on your MySpace wall. Then make a quick comment below saying “I did it!” or something creative along those lines, and you’ll find yourself with a horror/thriller book in your hands (e-reader).

And ONE LUCKY RANDOM winner will receive an AUTOGRAPHED copy of BOTH novels.

Ready? Go share!

Great article (checklist) from Chuck Wendig on preparing to write a novel

October 5, 2012 2 comments

The man can tell it like it is. While the word choice may be…colorful at times, Chuck Wendig, an über-successful author, has put together an absurdly helpful and spot-on 25-point checklist of how to prepare to write a novel. With National Novel Writing Month just around the corner, it’s quite timely as well. If you’ve ever considered writing a novel (and who hasn’t?), sit down for ten minutes with a cop o’ joe, a notepad, and pencil, and READ IT.

Some great nuggets:

• Are you excited? Does the prospect of writing this thing both geek you out and scare you in equal measure? It should. If you don’t, this might not be the story you want to write.

• Don’t go in totally blind. You don’t need to map every beat, but even three hastily-scrawled phrases on a bar napkin (“narwhale rebellion, yellow fever, Mitt Romney’s shiny grease-slick forehead”) will be better than nothing.

• Write every day, sure, duh. But more importantly: figure out how much you’re going to write on each of those “every days.”

And in my opinion the best one, saved for #25:

• Stop Doing All This Other Stuff And Write Already

But seriously – go READ IT.

 

Doing NaNoWriMo? Have a writing-on-a-schedule tip? Hit me up below…

Do one star reviews hurt sales? Or “how I spent a morning reading hilarious 50 Shades reviews”

October 1, 2012 14 comments

I read an article last week (well, the majority of an article) on top-selling Amazon titles with huge numbers of poor reviews. The article stemmed from the paid reviews scandal headed by John Locke and his ilk, but it got me thinking. Do negative reviews hurt sales? I know when I see a poor review hit for one of my books, I read it thoroughly (while I unscrew the top to the MD 20/20), trying to see something I can improve upon for a future work, or if the dude who left the review was just having a bad day. But I also wonder in the back of my mind if that review could impact future sales. (And then out comes the second bottle of the Mad Dog.)

There are many (myself included) who will start by reading the one-star reviews of a book before deciding to purchase. If they are isolated, unrelated complaints, fine; but if there is a trend, or similar issue, then the book itself might not make the TBR list. One of the most controversial and talked-about best sellers recently has been the 50 Shades series, so I decided to take a peek at the one-stars for the first in the series. You know, to see if they’d hurt sales.

Two hours and a cramp from laughing later, I couldn’t take it anymore. The reviews are scathing, and probably better written than the book itself. And darned if they aren’t downright hilarious. There are currently over FOUR THOUSAND one-star reviews of that first book…and here are some of my favorite snippets (no, I didn’t read all 4,000…I would be undergoing emergency spleen replacement surgery right now):

“I’m convinced the author has a computer macro that she hits to insert one of her limited repertoire of facial expressions whenever she needs one.”

“I feel stupid for reading this book and wish I had spent that ten bucks on socks.”

“If crap had an a$$hole, this would be shooting out of it”

“I want to give this book to someone I hate and tell them it’s awesome. That’s how bad it is.”

“Take Stephenie Meyer’s ham-handed, awkward writing and turn down the “quality” dial about four – maybe five – notches.”

“There’s no plot. I have never actually experienced a book with no plot.”

“My inner-goddess turned fifty shades of crap as I bit my lip and rolled my eyes.”

“Try to imagine of the smell of a large crate full of month-old eggs in the dumpster behind a questionable greasy spoon diner on a muggy, sticky August morning. With a dead skunk on top. And garbage juice dripping onto the pavement. And a drunk guy urinating onto the whole thing. Now imagine rolling in that dumpster. Naked. That’s how this book made me feel.”

“And yes, you don’t drive through Portland to get to Seattle from Vancouver.”

“The redundancy is infuriating. It’s a wonder Ana didn’t gnaw her own lips right off her face or Christians hair didn’t fall out from constantly running his fingers through it.”

“Fifty Shades of Grey is not the first book I’ve thrown across the room – it’s the second – but it is the first book I also kicked after it hit the floor.”

“Ms. Steele and Mr. Grey. Aren’t those clever last names? What were the chances?”

“James has accomplished the unthinkable: making Stephanie Meyer’s writing look worthy of the Pulitzer by comparison”

“Zero stars. I rather read iTunes user agreements.”

And my all-time favorite:

“This is like Ke$ha of literature.”

Feel free to list your fave in the comments section…or hey, to keep me in perpetual cramps, some one-stars from The Casual Vacancy…there seem to be a few. Like outnumbering the five-stars by almost 50%.

I don’t think Ms. James is worried about the one-star reviews; right now, the 50 Shades books occupy the 5th, 6th, and 8th spots in Amazon’s overall Best Sellers for Kindle. So I doubt she’s pulled herself away from making sure to ward off the coming autumn chill by stocking up on royalties invoices and hundred dollar bills for kindling (no Kindle pun intended, but it worked, didn’t it?).

Before anyone rises up and defends popular literature *cough* by saying I’m making fun of the books themselves and how dare I, I’m not. None of these are my reviews; just the ones that others wrote that caught my eye. I’m simply passing on the good word. And wondering if reviews mean anything at all, sales-wise, in the long run.

Oh, and the wife read all three 50 Shades books, and said to me…aloud… “Is this all you have to do to get published??” I think she holds me in less esteem now…

 

I’m running a 5K Sunday for Komen’s Race for the Cure – Can you support?

September 30, 2012 Leave a comment

UPDATE: A HUGE thanks to those who donated online:

Jobeleca
Mr. Michael Fisher
Ms. Deslyn Jules
Karen M Cornejo
Laura Lauterwasser
Mr. Mike Crate

With my wife’s and my donations/registration, we raised OVER $200 towards breast cancer research! And I got some killer during-run tweets, thanks everyone for those. I’m thrilled with the support!

Oh, and I finished alive — barely — in just under 35 minutes. Not my fastest, but considering I was up at 5:30 in the morning to drive to the race site…yeah, commendable in my mind.

Those of you who follow me on Twitter may see from time to time live tweets from a morning run (or if I’m really tired, a morning walk). I’ve been doing this off and on for a couple of years to not only get my fat butt in shape, but also because I used to run track way back in high school (and was fairly decent at it) and I want (need?) to run a 5K to prove to myself I can still do it. Lo and behold, the opportunity presented itself, and couldn’t be for a better cause.

A very good childhood friend of my wife’s was diagnosed with breast cancer, and seven years later she’s the picture of health. Ever since then, friends and family have gotten together for the Susan G Komen Race for the Cure as a group walk. My wife RAN the 5K last year (trust me, I was out of the country…I swear), and this year we’re BOTH in. So Sunday the 30th will be my first official 5K run, and I’d love your support – in any or all of three ways:

DONATE: My wife Tracy set up a page on the Komen site for friends to be able to make donations in support of the foundation in conjunction with the Race this weekend. The link is here: http://www.komencsnj.org/goto/umstead . We’re trying to exceed $200 in donations, which would be truly fantastic. Any amount is greatly appreciated, even a buck…

TWEET ME: Yes, Tweet me…during the run. I use an iPhone app called RunMeter, which not only posts automatically to Twitter with my pace, speed, distance, etc., but will also READ TWEETS ALOUD to me as I run. Several friends have gotten very creative with what they send during my runs (and you know who you are, zombie-lovers), and it’s really motivating to hear a voice in my headphones urging me along (any @ reply to me while the app is on is read out loud). The run starts at 8AM Eastern Time sharp on Sunday the 30th, and (with any luck) I’ll be done by 8:35. Or 9. Or maybe 9:30…

PASS THE WORD: If you can’t donate, or won’t be around Sunday morning at 8AM ET to Tweet, no problem. But would you mind passing the word along? An RT, or Facebook Author Page/Google+/blog share? I’d really appreciate the help.

My wife and I appreciate any support you can give – wish us luck!

Gabriel’s Redemption on sale to close out the month/quarter/summer/whatever…

September 28, 2012 Leave a comment

Just a quickie post to blather on about a price reduction for Gabriel’s Redemption, book 1 of my top-rated military science fiction trilogy. Normally $3.99, it’s on sale through the end of September for $2.99, a 25% off sale (don’t spend that saved buck all in one place). It’s available for the four major e-reader platforms (sorry, Sony/Diesel/Blackberry/stone tablet) plus Kindle UK:

Kindle US • Kindle UK • B&N Nook • iBooks • Kobo

.

Blurbage:

—-

North American Federation Navy Commander Evan Gabriel was dishonorably discharged after a disastrous mission on a far off world called Eden. He’s spent the last five years hiding from his past, from those responsible for the failed mission, from those responsible for running him out of the Navy, and from those originally responsible for making him into who he was – a highly-trained, physically and mentally augmented Special Forces soldier.

Two mysterious visitors appear unannounced at the door of a Gabriel’s seedy hotel room in the slums of Jamaica. His past has finally caught up with him.

From the decaying Caribbean to politically-charged South America, from the back alleys of Mars to a tiny colony on a planet six hundred light years from Earth, Gabriel’s Redemption is a near-future military science fiction story of a personal journey seen from the perspective of a soldier who has lost everything — one who desperately needs to redeem himself not only in his government’s eyes, but also his own.

Interstellar action and political intrigue mix with one-on-one battles on the surface of a frozen planet in Book One of the science fiction-adventure trilogy.

“A cast of interesting and believable characters and a plot that kept me turning the pages…I enjoyed the author’s take on technology and the political landscape of the future. Definitely recommended!” – Michael R. Hicks, bestselling author of the In Her Name science fiction-adventure series and the bestselling thriller Season of the Harvest.

—-

And hey, if you felt inclined to spread the good word, use the “Spread the Good Word” links below the post. Gracias!

 

P.S. Couple of freebies for you… Gabriel: Zero Point (prequel novella) is free for iBooks and Kobo, and Incursion (scifi short) is free for Kindle, iBooks, and Kobo.